All posts by Rob Betz

About Rob Betz

The owner and creator of LostLiners.com

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Costa Concordia

MS Costa Concordia was a Concordia-class cruise ship owned and operated by Costa Cruises, a subsidiary of American-British Carnival Corporation & Plc. The name Concordia was intended to express the wish for “continuing harmony, unity, and peace between European nations.”  She was the largest Italian cruise ship ever conceived was ordered on 19 January 2004 in Fincantieri and built in the Sestri Ponente yard in Genoa, as yard number 6122. She had an inauspicious launch at Sestri Ponente on 2 September 2005, when the champagne bottle failed to break; an incident some would say doomed her as this is held to be a bad omen for a ship.

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Titanic

Ask just about anyone to name a famous ocean liners and they’ll instantly blurt out the name Titanic. This ship has come to epitomize an entire era and the tragic tale of her one and only crossing resonates still, nearly 100 years later. This ship embodied the splendor of the last peaceful era in modern history. She also underscored the fundamental flaws in our society.

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Queen Elizabeth

RMS Queen Elizabeth was an ocean liner operated by the Cunard Line and was contracted to carry Royal Mail as the second half of a two-ship weekly express service between Southampton and New York City via Cherbourg. She first entered service in February 1940 as a troopship in the Second World War, and it was not until October 1946 that she served in her intended role as an ocean liner. Together with Queen Mary, Queen Elizabeth maintained a two ship weekly transatlantic service from Southampton to New York for over twenty years. With the decline in the popularity of these routes, both ships were replaced by RMS Queen Elizabeth 2 in 1969.

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Ivernia (1900)

Ivernia was built in 1900, by C.S. Swan & Hunter Ltd. in Newcastle. She was the sister ship to Saxonia. Her tonnage was 14,058 tons gross, 11,057 under deck and 9,052 net. She was 582 feet long with a 64.9 foot beam and holds 37.8 feet deep; She had twin screws, 4 masts, 3 steel decks. The upper and main decks were partly sheathed in wood. Steel orlop deck forward, orlop beams aft, steel shelter deck were also sheathed in wood. She was fitted with electric lights and refrigerating machinery.

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Ivernia (1955) / Franconia (1963)

RMS Ivernia was a Saxonia class ocean liner, built in 1955 by John Brown & Company in Clydebank, Scotland for Cunard Line, for their transatlantic passenger service between the UK and Canada. In 1963 she was rebuilt as a cruise ship and renamed RMS Franconia, after the famous pre-war liner RMS Franconia. She continued to sail for Cunard until being withdrawn from service and laid up in 1971. Continue reading Ivernia (1955) / Franconia (1963)

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Empress of Ireland

The Empress of Ireland was built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Govan near Glasgow in Scotland. The 14,191-ton vessel was a fixed price contract of £375,000 and was to be delivered to C.P.R. eighteen months from the date the contract was signed. The keel was laid for hull number 443 at Fairfield’s berth number 4 next to her sister ship, the Empress of Britain which was also under construction on 10 April 1905. Continue reading Empress of Ireland